Glossary

Agent: The agent is the individual in a drill who is doing the action.

Patient: The patient is the individual in a drill who is having the action done to them.

Longsword: Historically: a sword that is used with two hands. In fantasy gaming: a sword that is used with one hand. This confusion is the reason we refer to 2-h swords and 1-h swords.

Sword Hand: The hand that holds the sword. This term is extended to refer to the sword arm or the sword leg.

Shield Hand: The hand that does not hold the sword. It may hold an off-hand weapon or a shield, or it may be empty. This term is extended to refer to the off arm or the off leg.

Single Sword: Fighting with a sword alone – ie, your shield hand is empty.

1-h Sword: In Hundred Swords rules, a sword that is between 45cm and 115cm in overall length.

2-h Sword: In Hundred Swords rules, a sword that is between 115cm and 185cm in overall length.

Off-hand weapon: In Hundred Swords rules, a weapon that is no longer than 85cm, used in the shield hand alongside a longer weapon in the sword hand.

Buckler: A small shield held in the hand in punchgrip style.

George Silver: An English sword master writing in 1599. His two books Paradoxes of Defence and Brief Instructions Upon My Paradoxes of Defence form a fundamental basis for the cut-and-thrust style of fighting that we learn.

Tower Manuscript I.33: A German fencing manual, probably dating from around the mid-1300s, detailing a sword and buckler style of combat. The earliest known European fencing manual.

Edge Discipline: Striking with the edge of the weapon rather than the flat. Less important in Hundred Swords fighting (which uses touch to determine hits) than it is with HEMA or reenactment.

HEMA: Acronym: Historical European Martial Arts. The codified reconstruction of actual period fighting techniques from contemporary sources.

True Edge: The edge of the sword that is in the direction of the knuckles. The edge that most strikes are done with. The front edge.

False Edge: The edge of the sword that is usually turned towards the wielder. The back edge. Can occasionally be used to strike, but not normally.

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